ASCD empowers educators to achieve excellence in learning, teaching, and leading so that every child is healthy, safe, engaged, supported, and challenged. Comprising 113,000 members—superintendents, principals, teachers, and advocates from more than 129 countries—the ASCD community also includes 71 affiliate organizations.

Our diverse, nonpartisan membership is our greatest strength, projecting a powerful, unified voice to decision makers around the world.

ASCD Building

From Educator Preparation to Retirement

From the first day of a teacher preparation program to the last day on the job, ASCD supports educators regardless of their years of service, positions, or titles. We're committed to helping educators enhance their crafts and enhance their roles by providing high-quality, research-based resources and support they can trust.

ASCD strives to expand our influence as an international organization that is widely recognized for helping educators define, support, and engage in the development of highly effective learning systems.

Educators everywhere have a vision to change the world—one child at a time. It's our vision, too. Supporting the whole child is at the core of our mission and everything we do at ASCD as we work to ensure that each student is healthy, safe, engaged, supported, and challenged.

Supporting Educators Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow

Founded as the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, ASCD has spent more than 75 years embracing a unique and compelling set of core principles. It has focused not just on the academic goals of curriculum, but also on education's broader social dimensions, including the development of students' moral and creative capacities and an understanding of their diverse needs. It called for greater collaboration and cross-pollination between district leaders, school principals, and teachers (a priority soon reflected in its membership). And it sought to provide a trustworthy and independent forum for educator voice, support, and idea sharing, including on controversial and challenging issues.

During its first 75 years, ASCD has carried out and built on those principles in ways that even its forward-thinking founders might not have imagined. Through its publications, books, conferences, advocacy work, digital resources, professional development services, and—perhaps most of all—its membership, the organization has fostered a robust and ceaselessly questioning community of professional learners.

Meet the ASCD Executive Leadership Team

  Ronn Nozoe   raskin-n120x148.jpg
 

Ronn Nozoe
Interim Executive Director
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Noah Raskin
Chief Financial Officer
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  Fara Francis   Hisham Khalid
 

C. Fara Francis
Chief Information Officer
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Hisham Khalid
General Counsel
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ASCD Books: Thought Leadership, Covered

Since 1943, ASCD has published more than 750 titles. It now places more than 1 million books in the hands of educators every year. ASCD books have been published in more than 50 countries and 30 languages.

The Power of Membership

From its start, ASCD has been unique among education organizations because of its service to educators across the professional spectrum, from teachers to superintendents. Today, ASCD resources can be found in more than 38,000 U.S. public schools, and ASCD members and materials influence more than 18 million students.

The Conference for Every Educator

For decades, ASCD's annual conference, as well as its conferences on teaching and leading, have brought together thousands of educators from across the world to learn, network, and find inspiration.

Advocating for the Whole Child

From condemning censorship in schools in the 1940s, to supporting civil rights and equity in the 1950s and 1960s and protecting the integrity of public schools in the 1980s, ASCD has been a leading voice on key issues in education and society throughout its history.

In 2007, ASCD launched its Whole Child Initiative, spurred by this question from then–Executive Director Gene Carter:

If decisions about education policy and practice started by asking what works for the child, how would resources—time, space, and human—be arrayed to ensure each child's success? If the student were truly at the center of the system, what could we achieve?

Based initially on Abraham Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs, the ASCD Whole Child approach to education aims to ensure that each child, in each school, in each community is healthy, safe, engaged, supported, and challenged.